Monday, July 16

Elections 2018

Will not hold back on election campaign despite blasts: Imran Khan

Will not hold back on election campaign despite blasts: Imran Khan

Elections 2018
"I have no doubt that the blasts are happening with the connivance of forces that are sitting outside the country and those inside [the country]," Imran Khan railed today while referring to multiple incidents of targeting of political personalities. "The purpose of this is to get elections postponed and cause damage to the country and we want to tell them today ... no jalsas of PTI will be cancelled and Inshallah we will continue to hold jalsas until July 23." He also repeated his assertion that bomb blasts and tensions on the LoC begin whenever "a leader" is in trouble in Pakistan, a reference to PML-N leader Nawaz Sharif, who returned home last night only to be arrested in connection with a corruption reference against him.
MQM-P’s election manifesto finally revealed 11 days ahead of elections

MQM-P’s election manifesto finally revealed 11 days ahead of elections

Elections 2018
Barely two weeks before the general elections, MQM-P has finally released its manifesto. With all the intra-party drama MQM-P has been facing, however, it is understandable why an election manifesto might not have been on the top of their list of priorities. The manifesto itself is quite lacklustre. The party has repeated its age-old demand for new provinces and devolution of power to local bodies. In addition, the party proposes amendments in election laws in order to make the democratic system more inclusive. The party also calls for a "pragmatic approach" when it comes to setting targets for economic growth. The lack of grandeur, however, doesn't make the manifesto worthy of being ignored. The realistic and simplified proposals may not say much about their chances in upcoming poll...
Smokers’ corner: The NA-247 Armageddon

Smokers’ corner: The NA-247 Armageddon

Elections 2018
For a long time, Karachi’s NA-250 has been one of the city’s most unpredictable constituencies. It still is. Now even more so, as due to last year’s delimitation of constituencies, it has been merged with NA-249 to become NA-247. One of the biggest constituencies of Karachi has become even larger. As NA-250, it constituted the city’s main “posh” localities as well as some thickly-populated middle- and working-class areas. All of these localities are dotted by hefty pockets of Mohajir, Pakhtun, Baloch, Punjabi and Sindhi populations. The ethnic and class diversity of this constituency has become even more widespread with the merger of NA-249. Between 1988 and 2008, Karachi as a whole was overwhelmingly an Muttahida Qaumi Movement (MQM) stronghold, but with pockets such as Lyari and Ma